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A Diversity Entrepreneurs Partnership Initiative (D.E.P.I)

Who is at higher risk for COVID-19?

Post date: Aug 24, 2020

COVID-19 causes a mild illness in many people. But some people may be at higher risk for having severe symptoms from COVID-19. A recent study found that 88% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients had more than one chronic condition,* and other factors can also increase your risk.

You may be at high risk if you:

  • Are 65 or older
  • Live in a long-term care facility
  • Have an ongoing serious health condition, such as:
    • Lung disease or asthma
    • Heart conditions
    • High blood pressure
    • Severe obesity
    • Diabetes
    • Kidney or liver disease
    • A weakened immune system
    • Cancer treatment

If you’re pregnant, it may be safest to consider yourself at higher risk because information on how COVID-19 affects pregnant women is limited. To learn more about how the virus could affect you or your care, visit kp.org/maternity-covid.

If you have an ongoing health condition, here are some ways you can help keep yourself safe.

  • Stay home as much as you can.
  • Have supplies on hand, like food, household items, medical supplies, and over-the-counter and prescription medications.
  • Routinely clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces like doorknobs, light switches, and phones.
  • Limit visitors.
  • When you leave home, keep 6 feet of space between yourself and others.
  • Wear a cloth face cover when you’re near other people.
  • Wear gloves or carry tissues or paper towels with you to protect your hands when you need to touch things like door handles, shopping carts, and handrails.
  • Don’t touch your face, and wash your hands often.
  • Have a plan in case you get sick

If you develop symptoms of COVID-19 — such as fever, cough, or shortness of breath — call your doctor.

*Safiya Richardson et al., “Presenting Characteristics, Comorbidities, and Outcomes Among 5700 Patients Hospitalized With COVID-19 in the New York City Area,” Journal of the American Medical Association, April 22, 2020.

Source: Kaiser Permanente

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